Review: Foe

The novel opens with the reader meeting  Junior and Henrietta. The couple seems to be quite caring and live a comfortable, yet solitary life, on their farm. This farm is quite a ways out from the city and so when one day they get a knock on their door by an unexpected visitor their world…

Review: Ghost Wall

Ghost Wall, a slim tome from Sarah Moss, begins in the wilds of the north of England with a scene that is ripe with terror but seems far back into the past – before written language, before the comforts of modernity, and a time deeply mired in superstition. However, in Ghost Wall the past rarely…

Review: Spoonbenders

A type of book I’m not overly familiar with is that of the family drama. Perhaps I don’t read it much because we all have enough of that in real life or because it can be tough to keep up with all the characters or even just being intimidated by the sheer length of some…

Review: The Water Cure

Every year there are a few books that make the rounds not only on Bookstagram, but on traditional media and even via word of mouth among non-booklovers too…The Water Cure appears to be the first one of these in 2019. However, unlike others that I am more hesitant to pick up in fear they won’t…

Review: Disappearance at Devil’s Rock

Now that I’ve read almost all of Paul Tremblay’s books I think I can officially describe him in one word: eerie. The plots of books, and, this one especially, seem fairly basic. However, soon after you begin his books they soonly spin out of control and into paranoia and a strange realm between true crime…

Review: The Ritual

I watched the Netflix movie The Ritual in Fall 2018 and absolutely adored it. Folk horror is one of my favorite horror movie genres because I think the mix of building paranoia, forests, miscommunication, and an ancient evil is fascinating. Unfortunately, ‘folk horror’ as a book genre is a bit more difficult to find. So,…

Review: Severance

For a while, I had been skipping Book of the Month choices because this Fall wasn’t really doing it for me. However, that all turned around when I saw Severance by Ling Ma. The crux of the book is a bit strange – it’s a novel about the world and also the end of the…

Review: An Ocean of Minutes

The cover of An Ocean of Minutes is enough to draw you, nevermind the fabulous writing, imaginative world, and raw emotion contained within. What I thought would be a gripping read of a pandemic, time travel, and sci-fi adventure soon revealed itself to be a deeply personal, intimate view of the pitfalls, small glories, and…

Review: Dopesick

Dopesick is one of those non-fiction books that bites into you, refuses to let go, and takes a piece of you with it as you finish it. I don’t think the stories, sentiment, and statistics will leave me for some time. I was actually surprised at how deeply I was touched by Dopesick after having…

Review: The Oracle Year

Do you ever have one of those books that seems to follow you around, no matter what you may do? I first saw The Oracle Year the spring of 2018 when it was offered as a Book of the Month choice. I then saw it repeatedly at my local library branch through November 2018. First,…